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TFS Builds with Gulp, Chutzpah, & Jasmine

Integrating Gulp Processes into TFS Builds (and making them fail when they should) Though the new TFS 2015 build process is out, you may still find yourself needing (or wanting?) for whichever reason to use the XAML build definitions for Team Foundation Server. "But how can we take advantage of modern front-end build tools to provide better organisation and ensure code quality while still using the XAML definitions?" you might ask. Hopefully this gist will...

Observable Dictionary FTW

NSS Cohort 7 has recently been working on making Windows desktop applications in WPF (Windows Presentation Foundation). Mine was a simple note-taking app which organizes notes by category and date. I used a couple of ComboBoxes (what the rest of the world calls dropdowns) to select categories and search types, and since I wanted a particular selected item in the ComboBox to point to a particular value, I wanted to use a dictionary of key-value...

Chihuahua Inheritance

So, in August of 2014, my roommate happened upon a chihuahua in the middle of nowhere on a Saturday night in the pouring rain. This creature was then gifted to me (quite literally “Here, have a dog!”). Now, I’m not one for small dogs... especially chihuahuas. They’re often neurotic and way too yippy (also, chihuahuas, as I was soon to find out, are pretty much guaranteed to have horrible breath). So I entered this...

Using AngularJS for an MVC Design Pattern

Most NSS cohorts encounter the AngularJS framework to some degree. My cohort used it in our capstone projects for the front-end portion of the class after spending a couple weeks learning it. It took me a while to wrap my head around the MVC design pattern in general, but the good news is that Angular makes the whole process a little easier. MVC (Model-View-Controller) follows the principle of the separation of concerns - i.e....

Being a Roommate is a Job, and You Can Get Fired From It

There is a fantastic and (in certain circles) famous chapter written by anthropologist Igor Kopytoff on the commoditization of things. It is fortunately available through the University of Pennsylvania here. He covers many interesting ideas, but two are particularly relevant to the topic of living with roommates. I believe roommates coexist based upon the exchange of commodities and “gifts”. Kopytoff's lengthy definitions are both introduced as follows: “What, then, makes a thing...